KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

It is our privilege to welcome noted academics to present key findings of their current research.  Currently confirmed presenters include:

Professor Michael McLure – University of Western Australia, Australia
Associate Professor Robert Powell – Edith Cowan University, Australia
Professor Siobhan Austen – Curtin University, Australia
Professor David Dickinson – University of Birmingham, UK
Professor Tim Barmby – University of Aberdeen, UK

Professor Michael McLure

Michael McLure is a professor of economics at the University of Western Australia and is currently President of the WA Branch of the Australian Economic Society. His primary research field is the history of economic thought, where he specializes in tracing Vilfredo Pareto’s intellectual legacy in Italy and the Italian contribution to fiscal studies. He is the author of The Paretian School and Italian Fiscal Sociology (2007, Palgrave Macmillan) and was one of the editors of Vilfredo Pareto’s Manual of Political Economy: A Variorum Translation and Critical Edition (2014, OUP). Michael McLure was also co-editor of the History of Economics Review from 2007 to 2011 and he is the author of numerous refereed journal articles. His current historical research is focused on A. C. Pigou and the Cambridge School. For his secondary area of research, Michael undertakes studies of public policy in relation to the public finances of the Government of Western Australia.

 

Associate Professor Robert Powell

Associate Professor Rob Powell has 20 years banking experience and has been involved in the development and implementation of several credit and financial analysis models in banks. He has a PhD from Edith Cowan University, where he currently works as a researcher and senior lecturer in banking and finance. He is a director of the Markets and Services Research Centre, a cross-disciplinary centre which researches financial services, marketing, tourism and law. Rob’s main areas of research are credit and market risk.

 

Professor Siobhan Austen

Siobhan Austen is Head of the Department of Economics and Property Studies within the Curtin Business School and Co-Director of the Women in Social and Economic Research (WiSER) research cluster. Her research expertise is in the economic analysis of the gendered aspects of key social and economic policy debates around population ageing, retirement incomes and labour force participation. Siobhan has published more than 100 scholarly works, including high quality journal articles, book chapters and a book. She has led Australian Research Council and National Council of Vocational and Education Research grants, and participated in Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute and AusAID – funded projects. Siobhan is Co-editor of the Australian Journal of Labour Economics and on the editorial boards of Journal of Economic Issues, Feminist Economics, and Economics and Labour Relations Review. She is a member of the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Gender Statistics Advisory Group and the Work and Family Roundtable.

Professor David Dickinson

Prof. David Dickinson is a professor of Economics and Director of China Research Cluster at Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham. Prof. Dickinson became Head of Department of Economics in 2004 and served as Head of Business School between 2009 and 2012. He has also served as course director of SEANZA and visited universities in many countries. Prof. Dickinson published his books in Economics and Finance and his publication has appeared in international journals such as Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and MoneyEmerging Market Finance and TradePacific Basin Finance Journal. His research has been predominantly focused on theoretical and empirical issues in money, banking and finance.

Professor Tim Barmby

Professor Tim Barmby is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Aberdeen and visiting Professor of Economic History at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. His academic background is mainly in empirical labour economics, though in recent years he has concentrated on historical aspects of labour markets, predominately those of the 18th and 19th centuries. His present focus is on the evolution of labour contracts as economies move from pre-industrial to industrial stages.